“All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”

Ever since I started to go to school at a very early stage in my life it seemed that on Sundays the oxygen in the air was a little different from all the other days of the week. People always complain about Mondays, but for me the real enemy has always been the nefarious Sunday. There is nothing more depressing than waking up (hungover) on a morning of that aforementioned day, knowing that you have to get your s**t together for the start of a new week. That transition from weekend to weekday always haunted me down. Transitioning from irresponsibilities to responsibilities in a matter of hours is not a very pleasant thing. But today something rather unusual was in the schedule on a cloudy Sunday afternoon in Austin, Texas.

My dad decided to come in town for the day due to unforeseen circumstances. One of my long distant relatives passed away at a very short age, having battled with cancer and severe krohns for more than 15 years. I had no choice but to spend my Sunday by accompanying my dad to the Austin Memorial Cemetery to witness my first funeral. At first I thought how bad it could be to see a person that I honestly don’t remember ever meeting saying its final goodbyes before it gets buried underground for all eternity? Long story short, it hit me unexpectedly hard, but not for obvious reasons.

The moment I first heard the sound of soil hitting the casket at the moment of the burial, a number of thoughts were immediately triggered in my mind but only one really stood out from the rest. It is mind-blowing to think about how numbered our days can be before we all end up being in the same place, buried underground, either with a star of David, cross or other symbol above ground to point where our mortal rests lie. Sadly we cannot decide how much time we have left on this earth, but as a wiser man said, “all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” That is the destination we all share, and that particular Sunday I finally understood that death is indeed the single best invention of life to remind us that at the end of the day, we really don’t have anything to lose.

Approved

Advertisements

The Beer Glass: The Potential Releaser

A couple of days ago I decided to get the most basic artifact any beer enthusiast needs but often forgets/ignores due to simple convenience. This artifact is nothing more than a simple beer glass or pint (as it is called in the UK). The BarmakApproved definition of a beer glass is, to put it simply, a ‘potential releaser’.

Most of the times is really hard to have access to fresh draft beer when you’re not at a restaurant/bar, and the only obvious option left is to buy regular bottled beer. Once you have a good bottle of beer in your hand, and not ‘beer-flavored water’ as I mentioned on another post, you immediately open it and without thinking it twice you start drinking it from the bottle, which is nothing out of the ordinary. Doing it so is like driving a Honda when you have the potential to be driving a BMW (even a Ferrari if you had access to draft beer). A beer pint does precisely that; releases the potential trapped inside a bottle, which produces a much better drinking experience. Cheers!

The Difference Between Beer-Flavored Water and Beer

I’ve always made harsh distinctions between beer that tastes like water and real beer. This article provides a more ‘scientific’ approach to my life-long argument.

On one side, we have Anheuser-Busch, the macro-brewery that produces Budweiser along other infamous brands. This giant makes about 15 million barrels a year, one of the largest in the world. On the other is Perennial, a tiny, three-year-old craft brewery, based in the same city, St. Louis, MO, which makes just about a couple thousand barrels a year. Let’s see how they stack up with a couple of examples.

Unloading grain

Bottling & Packaging

For a more detailed comparison check out the original article: http://stlpublicradio.github.io/beer-gif/index.html

Approved

The Banality of Evil

The ‘banality of evil’ is a philosophical term meaning that evil occurs when ordinary individuals are put into corrupt situations that encourage their conformity.

Individual: Joseph “Sepp” Blatter

Situation: Being the president of FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association)

NotApproved